SYSCONF

Section: PARSEC Benchmark Suite (5)
Updated: December 2008
Index Return to Main Contents
 

NAME

sysconf - Format of a PARSEC system configuration  

DESCRIPTION

A system configuration is a configuration file of the PARSEC framework that describes how to perform basic tasks such as copying files or creating directories. It encapsulates all information specific to an operating system at a centralized location. The PARSEC framework can be ported to a new operating system by creating a corresponding system configuration and setting the configuration variables so that peculiarities of the new operating systems are correctly accounted for.

All system configuration files are executable bash scripts, which means that a large degree of freedom exists for writing these configurations. The script must set a number of predefined configuration variables which will be used as commands by the PARSEC tools. The first word of every string assigned to a configuration variable must be an executable statement on the respective operating system. It may be followed by any number of valid arguments for that statement. The PARSEC tools will append further arguments as needed. Some aspects of the behavior of the PARSEC framework such as the verbosity of certain operations can be tweaked by adjusting the options included in the string assigned to the configuration variable accordingly.  

EXAMPLE

The configuration variable UNTAR is used to unpack tar archives. It is resolved by the PARSEC tools as follows:

${UNTAR} TARFILE

The Linux system configuration defines the variable as follows:

UNTAR=tar -xvf

On Solaris the tar program is frequently only available as gtar. The Solaris system configuration hence defines the UNTAR variable as follows:

UNTAR=gtar -xvf

If verbose output is not desired for unpack operations, the option -v can be removed which will suppress most output.  

PREREQUISITES

System configurations do not have any prerequisites.  

CONFIGURATION VARIABLES

A system configuration must define the following variables:
MKDIR
Create a directory and all necessary parent directories. Do not output an error if the directory already exists.

Usage: ${MKDIR} DIRECTORY

LS
List contents of a directory

Usage: ${LS}

CP
Copy a list of directories and files to a destination directory. Recursively descend into directories, ignore errors, overwrite existing files and preserve symbolic links.

Usage: ${CP} SOURCE... DESTINATION

MV
Move a list of directories and files to a destination directory. Ignore errors and overwrite existing files.

Usage: ${MV} SOURCE... DESTINATION

RM
Remove files or directories recursively and ignore errors.

Usage: ${RM} FILE...

DATE
The current date and possibly also time in a format convenient to read for humans.

Usage: ${DATE}

LOGDATE
The current date and possibly also time in a format that can be part of the name of the log file. Special characters that are inconvenient to have in a file name or that cannot be part of a file name should be avoided. The timestamp should be accurate enough so that consecutive runs of the PARSEC tools will get different results, otherwise log data might get lost.

Usage: ${LOGDATE}

TEE
Read input from stdin, write it to stdout and also append it to a file.

Usage: ${TEE} FILE

CAT
Output a file to stdout.

Usage: ${CAT} FILE

UNTAR
Unpack a tar archive.

Usage: ${UNTAR} FILE

 

FILES

config/*.sysconf
System configuration files are located in the global config/ directory. Each supported operating system has its own file named after it. System configuration files use the ending .sysconf.
 

AUTHOR

Written by Christian Bienia.  

COPYRIGHT

Copyright (c) 2006-2009 Princeton University  

SEE ALSO

parsec(7), parsec.conf(5), bldconf(5), runconf(5), parsecmgmt(1), bash(1)


 

Index

NAME
DESCRIPTION
EXAMPLE
PREREQUISITES
CONFIGURATION VARIABLES
FILES
AUTHOR
COPYRIGHT
SEE ALSO

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Time: 04:41:54 GMT, February 24, 2009